Blog

Building Developer Sandboxes on AWS

The ability to experiment is one of the unsung benefits of cloud computing. It was, in fact what drew me to AWS in 2008. At Chariot, we have multiple sandbox environments, some for specific projects and some for general play, and recommend that our clients do the same. However, sandboxes need some controls, to ensure that they don’t become a source of runaway costs.

GraphQL, the new Contender to REST

The Representative State Transfer (REST) protocol has been the king of remote access protocols for web applications for well over a decade. The general pattern: expose “nouns” (Customers, Activities, Employees, Tasks, Sasquatches) as URLs (/api/sasquatch/32) and access them via HTTP “verbs” such as “GET”, “POST” (create), “PUT” (update), or “DELETE” (umm, well…). The content type is specified via HTTP headers such as Content-Type (for data being received by the client) and Accepts (for a data request). The reason this works…